Dayna Ferrari – Student Highlight

Clinical Medical Assistant student Dayna Ferrari started attending WVJC in August 2020 after graduating from Capital High School.  Dayna said, “My decision to attend WVJC was an easy one.” Dayna has always had an interest in the medical field. She said, “WVJC Clinical Medical Assistant program is fast-track, has smaller classes, and offers a flexible schedule which gave me the confidence to start my college education.”

The Clinical Medical Assistant program at WVJC offers various courses that provide students hands-on training in clinical skills for entry-level positions working in any setting in healthcare. Dayna said, “My favorite class so far is Anatomy and Physiology with Dr. Settle. I have always been enthralled by the inner workings of the body and how it functions.” Another favorite class of Dayna’s is her medical assisting lab class taught by Program Director Chelsea Abbott. She said, “I find the lab work very interesting and hands-on, which helps me focus and retain the information I have learned.”

Dayna has worked as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) for two years. She enjoys helping people but is looking forward to expanding her scope of practice as a Certified Medical Assistant. After graduation, Dayna wants to work as a medical assistant in a pediatric setting. Her long-term goal is to become a Registered Nurse in the pediatric wing of a hospital, married, and have her own home and start a family. In her free time, Dayna enjoys binge-watching her favorite shows on Netflix and researching medical issues taking place around the globe.

We asked Dayna if she has any advice for a new student, she said, “My advice to new students would be to make sure you start on a strong foot, don’t be afraid to talk to your instructors, they understand everything that is going on, big or small.  Get involved in the school; it will help you to succeed more.”

Dayna said, “I would absolutely recommend WVJC to friends and family! Growing up, I always needed one-on-one communication with my teacher; not only did I get that at WVJC, but it also offered an environment where I could focus and buckle down.  The staff is also very understanding in regards to your life outside of school, and the flexible schedule makes it easier to keep my job and focus on my studies without becoming overwhelmed.”

To learn more about WVJC’s Clinical Medical Assistant program, request information here!

Five Tips and Tricks for a Successful On-Ground Student

Being a full-time, residential student can sometimes be difficult. From balancing a strict class schedule during the day with work and life, to finding parking, sometimes it takes a little extra motivation to help an on-ground student get going in the mornings. While somewhat less-flexible than an online environment, on-ground capacity does come with its perks. Ease of access to face time with instructors and administrators and bonding opportunities with classmates who become friends help guide our on-ground students as they progress through their programs.

Though it can be tough, there are a number of tips and tricks that one can utilize to improve their chances of success as an on-ground student and increase their performance at the same time. These tips and tricks are helpful whether you’re brand new to our institution or a seasoned veteran. Some of these overlap with our online guide because some tips are universal, regardless of your situation. Others are specific to on-ground.

Number 5 – Meet and Really Get to Know Your Instructors

For the online countdown, this one was listed as “Managing Distractions.” While that is definitely something you will need to accomplish as an on-ground student at WVJC, another just as important tip is to really get to know your instructors. These individuals are professionals in their fields with real-world, expert knowledge. They also have families, hobbies, favorite songs and movies, and everything in between.

Most of our instructors teach multiple classes at the school, and though you are only there for a short while (in the grand scheme of things 18 months flies by), they will be a pretty big part of your life during that 18 months. So, take some time to get to know them. Our instructors are wonderful people and who love to help their students. It’s rarely the exam score that instructors remember about a student, but rather the conversations, personalities, and effort shown in and outside of class.

Your instructors will serve not only as teachers, but mentors and eventually colleagues, so take some time to get to know them!

Number 4 – Get Involved on Campus

This year, the students and administration at WVJC Morgantown established our first Student Government Association. President Sean Wilfong has led the way and they have done many things in and outside of school. Over the summer, they participated in Kid’s Day and went to a Make-A-Wish Breakfast. They have scheduled a pizza party and costume contest for Halloween and are helping with Toys-for-Tots later on this year. The students are organizing a group to run in a 5k for charity and many other wonderful things.

The calendar for next year has not been planned, so it’s an open slate. Have something you’d love to see happen at WVJC? Wish you could make a bigger impact during your time here? There are numerous ways to get involved with SGA from serving on the SGA Council to simply signing up as a volunteer to help with events and participate in the out-of-school activities. The group is incredibly engaging and welcoming to any students who want to be a part of it.

Even if you decide you don’t want to take on an active role, consider shooting recommendations to dblankenship@wvjc.edu. You can also email Dustin at that address for more information on how to get involved with SGA.

Number 3 – Time Management

It is incredibly important to manage your time effectively when you are a student.

You need to develop a schedule that works for you. While yes, you will have assignment due dates and exams set by your instructors, you are in control of your own schedule outside of school. You will need to study, to work, to take care of family or personal issues, and all sorts of other things that come up. Creating a schedule that allows you to finish everything will be key in finding success as an on-ground student at WVJC. Another issue that sometimes arises with time management is tardiness. Plan ahead and leave early if the weather is particularly bad or if you know the WVU students are back in session. As the old saying goes, “When you fail to plan, you plan to fail.”

Finally, Brittany Nuzzo, WVJC Morgantown’s Dean, is the best scheduler in the building. This lady knows everything there ever was to know about time management. If you are struggling with making a schedule and keeping it, take some time, go up to the third floor and have a conversation with her about this. You will not regret it!

Number 2 – Confidence

This one may seem short compared to the others, but confidence is key. As an on-ground student, it is really easy to become intimidated by your instructors or even your classmates when asked to speak up in class or present on a topic. It is important to remember that all of us are people and that your fellow students are here to learn and grow just like you, and your instructors are here because they are passionate about teaching and have a burning desire to help you achieve your dreams.

One of the most disheartening things is a student who is afraid to speak up. Engage with your classmates and your instructor during discussions. Stay after class and approach your instructor. Ask them questions about the subject matter.

Don’t let one bad exam score change your perspective. Sometimes we mess up. That is a fact. If you are working hard to be a good student and one score just doesn’t go your way, don’t let it get you down. Figure out what you did wrong and pledge to do better next time, then do it!

Believe in yourself and your abilities. You are enough. You are able. You can succeed. Show everyone else what you already know – that you are strong and your dreams are within your reach.

Number 1 – Understand “You”

This one is universal and is exactly the same as our online countdown because it’s too true. When speaking about education, everyone has their own learning style and you should never put yourself in a box. For example, if you are a “white board” person –meaning you like to make a large list on a white board and cross it off as you complete it –then by all means continue to do that in place of using a planner. Do what works for you. Each of these tips is broad so that you can determine what approach to it will help you find the most success.

Five Tips and Tricks for a Successful Online Student

The life of an online student can be especially rewarding and full of personal and professional successes – from acing an exam while working a full-time job to nailing a discussion post while caring for a newborn, and everything in between. There are so many opportunities and the online platform provides the necessary flexibility to manage all those endeavors and still succeed in obtaining your degree.

Five Tips and Tricks for a Successful Online Student

Unfortunately, the same flexibility that can help online students be successful, can also lead to disastrous results without attentiveness, time management, and confidence. Sometimes, flexibility leads us to decide that we can “kick the can down the road,” putting off that homework assignment or lecture until tomorrow. Because of this, two students with similar abilities, in the same course, at the same time can have totally different results.

Fortunately, there are a number of tips and tricks that one can utilize to improve their chances of success as an online student and increase their performance at the same time. The tricks are tried and true and are helpful whether you’re brand new to online learning or a seasoned veteran. As the WVJC Online Orientation Coordinator, I work with our new students in developing these habits so that they are ready to run, excel, and most importantly, succeed.

Number 5 – Manage Distractions

Imagine this: While driving, your phone begins to ding with a dozen text messages all being delivered at the same time; the music on your stereo accidentally gets turned up to max; your child begins to scream, cry, and kick the back of your seat; and the car right in front of you slams on their brakes. BAM! You would have avoided the accident, but unfortunately, you were too distracted to notice the car in front of you before it was too late.

The scenario above is not so different when it comes to doing online coursework. When listening to lectures, reviewing for exams, or doing assignments, you may be tempted by the thousand other things going on in your world. It is important to try to find a separate time and place away from distractions so that you can focus on the work in front of you. For some, that means waiting to work on your assignments until after your children go to sleep, for others that means doing your work at the local library or after work at your desk. Regardless of what approach you use, managing distractions is the first step in success as an online student.

Number 4 – Communication

Five Tips and Tricks for a Successful Online Student
(Photo Credit: @LanguageDalek (Twitter))

Sometimes assignments are confusing. Sometimes you will get distracted. Sometimes you won’t be able to see the forest for the trees. You need to know that that is okay and that it happens to all of us at one time or another. There are so many times that I’ve been preparing for a lecture and gotten lost in my own thoughts. This doesn’t mean that there’s something wrong with you. It also doesn’t necessarily mean there’s something wrong with the assignment or lecture you’re reviewing. Sometimes the way information is communicated and the way we comprehend just happen to be working on two different wavelengths.

The solution to this is simple, but often we do the wrong thing. So many times, I’ve seen students shut down or just decide to not turn in an assignment when confused. The solution? Communicate. Reach out to the instructor via phone, text, email, etc. Explain what you are struggling with. Word of advice: Ask specific questions. Good communication will always remedy the worst confusion.

Number 3 – Time Management

I feel like I preach this to my students constantly to the point that saying “time management” probably makes their ears want to bleed. However, it is incredibly important to manage your time effectively when you are working as an online student.

You need to develop a schedule that works for you. Plan for assignments and lectures as they’re due and work on them throughout the week. Schedule in your work as well as things like laundry and dinner. One thing that works incredibly well is to schedule in a reward time as well as leisure time. Plan to take some time out of your week to relax and enjoy yourself. I have a couple of students who bank that time until the weekend. They complete all of their assignments Monday through Friday while working a weekly job, then on the weekend, they plan adventures as a reward for finishing their assignments on time. If they are unable to complete their assignments, no adventure that week, BUT, they still are able to finish them before they are due on Sunday because they have managed their time effectively.

Keep a planner. Use a Google or Outlook calendar. Do whatever works for you, but definitely begin planning early if you want to be successful both as a student and in life.

Number 2 – Confidence

This one may seem short compared to the others, but confidence is key. As an online student, it is really easy to become intimidated by your instructors or even your classmates because you aren’t face-to-face with them each day. It is important to remember that all of us are people and that your fellow students are here to learn and grow just like you and your instructors are here because they are passionate about teaching and have a burning desire to help you achieve your dreams.

One of the most disheartening things I see is a student who is afraid to speak up. Engage with your classmates and your instructor on discussion posts. Contact your instructor and ask them questions about the subject matter. (Even if it’s not something in the assignments, we love this stuff and we will always be happy to engage).

Believe in yourself and your abilities. You are enough. You are able. You can succeed. Show everyone else what you already know – that you are strong and your dreams are within your reach.

 

Number 1 – Understand “You”

I always smile when making this kind of list because it’s so easy for someone to sit here and tell you how to do something when they aren’t in your shoes. Though I have seen these tips and tricks work for students of all ages, it doesn’t mean that everything works exactly the same way for everyone. When speaking about education, everyone has their own learning style and you should never put yourself in a box. For example, if you are a “white board” person –meaning you like to make a large list on a white board and cross it off as you complete it –then, by all means, continue to do that in place of using a planner. Do what works for you. Each of these tips is broad so that you can determine what approach to it will help you find the most success.

If you are struggling to find a solution or you feel like you need more advice (or just someone to spitball study habits ideas off of) please feel free to reach out to me at dblankenship@wvjc.edu. I am always happy to help a student looking to improve themselves and have been in your shoes, so please utilize me as a resource.